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Daniel Padrón (pronounced pah-DRŌN)  was born in Caracas, Venezuela in 1966. When he was merely 3 years old, his mother discovered that he had perfect pitch when from another room he correctly identified notes she played on the piano.

During childhood Daniel was exposed to jazz and Latin music by his father, though he also credits his American mother for influencing his musical style. When he was young, he clearly preferred Latin music over jazz, because one can often dance to Latin music more easily. Later on, he acquired a much greater liking for jazz, and now incorporates both into his musical style. 

At age 13, Daniel began studying piano. He later went to Georgia State where he studied piano with Geoff Haydon while getting his B.A. in Music Theory. Perfection of his piano technique was furthered by friend and colleague You-Ju Lee. Daniel's talent as a composer emerged during his college years, and some of his jazz works were performed by Georgia State students.

Shortly after graduating from college, Daniel formed a jazz trio named Wild Rice. The band has evolved over the years, adding Daniel's Latin jazz compositions to their repertoire and eventually growing to a 6 piece instrumental jazz band. Wild Rice has performed at venues all over Atlanta, including the 2003 Atlanta Jazz Festival.

As a piano soloist, Daniel has performed for restaurants, lounges, and private parties. He has also performed with many artists in Atlanta including Dave Bass, Rebecca Windham, Sam Skelton, and was a member of the band The Solutions during the mid-1990's. 

One of Daniel's recently completed composition projects is a collection of nocturnes for solo piano using all 24 major and minor keys, in the tradition of the preludes composed by Bach, Rachmaninoff, and Chopin. Publication of the nocturnes in print is planned for 2004. The first five nocturnes may be heard on the upcoming CD release (see Recordings), along with other solo piano compositions.